Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Best Viewed with Browser Opened to Full Screen
First Do No Harm

 GO HOMEHome 

Dragon E-mail

      Help / Tips      Help

Snap! Search

Web Options      

yahoo.comMetaCrawler Searchdog-pile search

Search Upcreek

Table of Contents

WildMind Reference DeskWildMind
Library

AskERIC

Medical Dictionary

MedLine

Rxlist.com

InfoPlease

Internet RefDesk

Internet Library

Research It

C/Net: A-Z List

Dictionary

Grammar/Style

Encarta

Britannica (wmind)

WildMind Maps

WildMind Timelines

WildMind Clipart

Version:  B1.0 

TestLab

Up First Do No Harm PPS Intro PPS Reference By Date By Symptoms

The Upcreek Post-Polio "First Do No Harm" page focuses on drugs, treatments, activities, etc. that have been reported to have serious negative effects on people diagnosed with PPS, and specifics of PPS that make it necessary to modify "standard" treatments, such as pain relief or blood pressure medication and anesthesia. It is intended as essential Education aimed at polio survivors, family and medical professionals who care for them. .

copper-dragon.gif (9287 bytes)WB01356_.gif (356 bytes)                                        

Be True To Your PPS and Your Teeth Won't Be False To You: Preventing Complications in Polio Survivors Undergoing Dental Procedures 1996. Bruno, Richard L.,PhD. PPS Monograph Series. Volume 6(1):1-8. Hackensack: Harvest Press. Unfortunately, only a handful of specialists treat Post-Polio Sequelae (PPS) - the unexpected and often disabling fatigue, muscle weakness, joint pain, cold intolerance, and swallowing, sleep and breathing problems - occurring in America's 1.63 million polio survivors 40 years after their acute polio. However, all medical professionals need to be familiar with the neurological damage done by the original poliovirus infection that today causes unnecessary discomfort, excessive physical pain and occasionally serious complications with surgery. This is a brief overview to inform patients and professionals about the cause and prevention of complications in polio survivors undergoing dental surgery.
Do's and Don'ts *Starting Point. "A Guide for Post-Polls: Do's and Don'ts General Therapies and Things to Avoid." Article put together by the Easter Seal Society of Washington. Keywords: Adaptation
Preventing Complications in Polio Survivors Undergoing Surgery 1996. Bruno, Richard L. PhD. PPS Monograph Series. Volume 6(2). Hackensack:Harvest Press. Unfortunately, only a handful of specialists treat Post-Polio Sequelae (PPS) - the unexpected and often disabling fatigue, muscle weakness, joint pain, cold intolerance, and swallowing, sleep and breathing problems - occurring in America's 1.63 million polio survivors 40 years after their acute polio. However, all medical professionals need to be familiar with the neurological damage done by the original poliovirus infection that today causes unnecessary discomfort, excessive physical pain and occasionally serious complications after surgery. This is a brief overview to inform patients and professionals about the cause and prevention of complications in polio survivors undergoing surgery.
Includes: POLIO SURVIVORS' PRE-OP CHECKLIST
Spinal Tap for PPS? NO! 1997/05. Walter, Tom. Over the past couple of years some interesting and exciting discoveries have been made about the polio virus that were unknown before. Researchers at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland (USA) and at the Pasteur Institute in France have been able to identify fragments of mutated polio virus RNA genetic material from the spinal fluid of people who had "wild" polio (like most of us) and from the spinal fluid of those who had the polio vaccines.
What You Should Know About Your Medications 1996. Walker, J.M., Ph.D., PT, AM Whelan, Phar. D. Medications (drugs), may be by prescription (Rx), or Over-The-Counter (OTC). As a polio survivor you should become an informed user of drugs. (Also see WORD OF MOUTH below for more information on medications and treatments that may cause problems)